Structure and Support

Ideas from the field: Helping ďAspiesĒ succeed.

Illustration by Darren Thompson

A Scout in L.R.ís troop has Aspergerís syndrome (an autism spectrum disorder) and struggles with advancement requirements and unstructured activities. Sheís looking for ways to help her Scout succeed.

MAKE A LIST, CHECK IT TWICE
We have a Scout with Aspergerís, and we have put together a checklist of what we want him to achieve during meetings, camp-outs, etc. We sit down together, so he has buy-in. We do a ďtable-topĒ exercise with him to preview whatís going to happen, so he is familiar with his assignments by the time the camp-out takes place.

J.J.
Colorado Springs, Colo.


STRUCTURE IS KEY
Camp-outs are well outside his normal routine, so plan them in advance. Make a schedule and stick to it. Donít forget to include some downtime; he will need to decompress after new experiences. With advancement, set small, short-term goals and offer minor rewards for achieving them. Remember: Aspergerís kids are of average to above-average intelligence, so never patronize him.

Pack Committee Chair J.R.
Sharpsburg, Ga.


SHOW THE VISUALS
ďAspiesĒ are visual learners. Show how to do something, one step at a time, while speaking the instructions, then do it once together, then watch him as he tries himself. All directions must be broken down into single steps. Visual aids like knot-tying videos and knot boards are very beneficial. Immediate recognition, such as stickers and a sticker chart, is essential.

Aspies have a very narrow focus of interests. Focusing on his strengths will allow him to enjoy and benefit from Scouting. My son has Aspergerís, and Scouts has been wonderful for him.

Webelos Leader J.S.
Potomac, Md.


CUT HIM SOME SLACK
Group activities are hard for him. Allow him a little latitude when it doesnít infringe on anyone else. For example, is sitting absolutely vital, or is it O.K. to stand at the back? Sometimes little things like that can really help make him more comfortable. If he starts displaying anger, anxiety, or agitation, removing him from the situation and providing some quiet with adults will usually start him on the process of self-calming.

Troop Committee Chair S.E.
Columbus, Ohio


USE THE BUDDY SYSTEM
Find a younger Scout he is comfortable with, and pair them up. This worked well with the Scout with Aspergerís I had in my troop. He was my first Eagle Scout.

Scoutmaster T.S.
Channelview, Tex.


POP SOME QUESTIONS
If you havenít already done so, talk to the boyís parents and teacher about how to provide structure and help him succeed. And remember to ask the boy himself. After all, itís his experience.

Scoutmaster T.J.W.
Tooele, Utah


THREE SIMPLE SECRETS
I have Aspergerís syndrome. Three things proved helpful to me: adult leaders who were patient with me, adult leaders who explained directions carefully, and adult leaders who had a genuine interest in me as a person.

Major J.C.
Baton Rouge, La.


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